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This Week’s Featured Artist and Artwork at David Richard Gallery – Emily Mason

Emily Mason Myself Be Noon, 2002 Oil On Canvas, 39" x 38" Copyright © Emily Mason

Emily Mason
Myself Be Noon, 2002
Oil On Canvas, 39″ x 38″
Copyright © Emily Mason

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.

 

EMILY MASON (American b. 1932)

Born in New York in 1932, Emily Mason comes from a long line of distinguished artists. Her mother, Alice Trumbull Mason, was an influential participant in the early days of American abstraction and a descendant of the famous history painter John Trumbull.

Upon graduation from the Cooper Union, Mason received a Fulbright Grant to study in Italy, travelling there with her fiancé, the painter Wolf Kahn. For the next 10 years, Rome was to become a second home for the couple. Her first solo exhibition in New York was at the Area Gallery in 1960. The gallery, founded by painter Ed Moses, was one of several artist-run spaces on East 10th Street, representing the avant-garde in New York in the late 50s and early 60s.

Writing in The Brooklyn Rail, publisher and critic Phong Bui describes Mason’s position between abstract expressionism and color field painting, noting: “She was interested in neither the former’s existential angst nor the latter’s use of absorbed color pigments on raw canvas (she paints on primed canvases). By allowing painterly gestures to coexist with thin, poured layers in a wide range of colors in all manner of hues and saturations, Mason is able to amplify her colors—which are infused with forms that derive from both memory and free association with concrete surroundings in nature—while embracing their complex tonalities.”



Strangers Collective Exhibition ‘Narrows’ At The Santa Fe Community Gallery

The Santa Fe-based group Strangers Collective, http://strangersartcollective.com, led by curators, artists and writers Jordan Eddy and Kyle Farrell, is a consortium of artists and writers that, in a very short period, have emerged as the vanguard of a vast energetic and eclectic mix of cutting-edge creativity radiating from this desert community.

 

Their current offering Narrows, at the Community Gallery, May 20 through June 10, 2016, http://www.santafenm.gov/community_gallery_schedule, presents a selection of work in a variety of media. The small-scale nature of many of the works may have been born out of cramped studio spaces, yet they live large within this exhibition. Photography, sculpture, painting, assemblage and new media are all in evidence, demonstrating the breath of concerns, both material and conceptual. A lot of good stuff is on view, but there are two notable standouts:

 

The two works by Katherine Lee, Shelf 1 and Shelf 2 are beautifully constructed narrative ‘landscapes.’ Just what the narrative might be can only be imagined, whether it is autobiographical or a collection navigational guideposts. The tiny domestic scale of these works is jam-packed with information and imagery.

 

Marcus Zúñiga’s  Constelaciones (Tesseract, Spiral, Penrose) is part of a spare new media installation. A three-channel video work, Constelaciones sits on the floor, forcing the viewer to look down at the universe in microcosm, rather than upwards towards an immeasurable expanse.

 

The Strangers Collective vibe is being picked up by cognoscenti far beyond the city limits. Co-founder Jordan Eddy is already on a national short-list of established and upcoming art writers engaged with contemporary art criticism. The contribution that groups like Strangers Collective are making to the creative environment is a continuum of many decades of visual arts activity in Santa Fe. The important difference is that it is now having a public face.

 

Howard Rutkowski

Santa Fe

2016 06 08

 

 

Katherine Lee, Strangers Collective, Santa Fe Community Gallery, Narrows

Katherine Lee, Shelf 1, Mixed Media, at Strangers Collective exhibition “Narrows”

 

 

Katherine Lee, Strangers Collective, Santa Fe Community Gallery, Narrows

Detail: Katherine Lee, Shelf 1, Mixed Media, at Strangers Collective exhibition “Narrows”

 

 

Katherine Lee, Strangers Collective, Santa Fe Community Gallery, Narrows

Katherine Lee, Shelf 2, Mixed Media, at Strangers Collective exhibition “Narrows”

 

Marcus Zuniga, Strangers Collective, Santa Fe Community Gallery, Narrows

Marcus Zuniga, Constelaciones, 2016, New media installation at Strangers Collective exhibition “Narrows”


 

 



Terri Rolland at the Santa Fe Collective

To achieve understanding it is necessary to not see many things, but to look hard at what you do see.

                         Giorgio Morandi

 

Painter Terri Rolland has cited the reclusive, obsessive artist from the last century, Giorgio Morandi, as one that holds some sway over her own working process. Certainly the Italian artist’s endless monochrome paintings of unglazed stoneware pottery – clay painted in clay, as it were – is not merely an interest in color, form and composition, but truly a Zen approach to the making of images. It is a meditative process and one that Rolland has successfully and invitingly adopted.

Rolland’s small-format paintings, combined in groups or flying solo, remind one of ideograms or glyphs that derive from a collective consciousness with origins from every continent and culture on this planet. Yes, art history abounds, but Rolland works with an holistic approach to both method and material:

“I work with elemental and honed images: drawn outlines of squares and blocks sink into the clay and call for more layers until the right final drawing is accepted. The repeated images become a group, or cluster, as the panels are assembled and the painting comes together. These are groups of basic elements and quantities, humble monuments to continuity, standing together resolutely. They have a right to be there, things are fair. What I am looking for is not refinement, but a felt sense of rawness and informality – and sometimes mischief. I want to represent things barely visible or valued, but completely present and essential.”

When one looks at Morandi, one can imagine him influencing Philip Guston, Robert Mangold or Robert Ryman. It is unknown that any of them had any exposure to Morandi, but living in Italy Cy Twombly would have certainly come across his work. All of these artists possessed the desire to explore gestural repetition, the reduction of imagery to signs or symbols and a keen interest in materials.

Perhaps the best comparison, should one be necessary, is to Paul Klee, who understood visual language long before many others. Abstraction, reduction and the human spirit provide a common means of communication without any narrative. Rolland’s simple and humble works strike those chords with delicacy and meaning.

Rolland is definitely channeling all of that exploration and energy into something that is at once formal, conceptual and embracing of art history, but possesses a deep personal spirituality. These are not abstract exercises in materials and composition, but true talismans of experience and translation.

Terri Rolland’s series of new paintings were most recently on view at the Santa Fe Collective, May 14-June 8, 2016 http://www.santafecollective.com/terri-rolland/. Her works on paper are currently on view at Schema Projects in Brooklyn until June 19.

Howard Rutkowski

Santa Fe

Posted, 2016 June 13

 

All Artwork: by artist Terri Rolland © 2015 Terri Rolland. All rights reserved.

Terri Rolland, Santa Fe Collective

Terri Rolland, Five Protections, 2015, acrylic and clay paint, 12 x 20 x ¾”

 

 

Terri Rolland, Santa Fe Collective

Terii Rolland, Five Vigors, 2015, Acrylic and clay paint, 12 x 18 x ¾”

 

 

Terri Rolland, Santa Fe Collective

Terri Rolland, Red Center, 2015, Acrylic and clay paint, 18 x 6 x ¾”

 

 

Terri Roland, Santa Fe Collective

Terri Rolland, Three Ways, 2015, acrylic and clay paint, 18 x 6 x ¾”

 

 

Terri Rolland, Santa Fe Collective

Terri Rolland, Three Energies, 2015, Acrylic and clay paint, 15 x 5 x ¾”



MICHAEL DIXON This Week’s Featured Artist and Artwork

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, The Fourth of July is Yours, Not Mine, 2015, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 36″ x 1.5″ Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

 

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.
MICHAEL DIXON
Michael Dixon explores the personal, societal, and aesthetic struggles of belonging to both “white” and “black” racial and cultural identities, yet simultaneously belonging fully to neither. The works of artists such as Robert Colescott, Beverly McIver, Michael Ray Charles, Glenn Ligon, and Kerry James Marshall have informed his work.

Born in San Diego, Dixon received his MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder and is currently an Associate Professor at Albion College, Michigan. His work has been shown both nationally and internationally in public and private institutions.

 

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, Let Me Say That We Have Failed To Say Something To America Enough, 2015, Oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

 

Artist Statement

“I use self-portraiture as a narrative device to explore the areas of identity, race, identity perception, African American history, and social justice. I often use my own racial identity as the topic of my work. I have experienced fluidity in the perception of my race and ethnicity as a light skinned, bi-racial Black man. My struggles to fit into a racial group category and how I fashion an authentic self, while constantly feeling like an outsider, is the foundational and emotional content of my work. I am primarily interested in the experiences of bi-racial people who might share in this struggle. Is there a unique bi-racial experience? My work seeks to find out.

“Along with my personal identity struggles, the historical legacy of racism in the United States for communities of color informs my experiences. My current work responds to the police killings of unarmed Black men, women, and children across America. While this is a constant attack on the Black community, the increased international media attention, public awareness, and public movements are new phenomena. The recent killings of Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner to Tamir Rice and Michael Brown, illustrate that Black victims can range in age from 12 to 50 years old. This raises the question of the value of Black bodies in contemporary America, which is linked to a long history of violence against its Black population through slavery, Jim Crow, and mass incarceration. My aim is to locate myself in this discussion as a bi-racial Black man who has both been the victim of racism and has in some instances “passed” for white because of my light skin. I see this as the cost of a legacy of racism that particularly troubles me and this conversation must continue.”

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, Raghead I, 2015, Oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Fiigure

Michael Dixon, The Antagonist, 2015, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 60″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, The New Jim Crow, 2015, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 60″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon



This Week’s Featured Artist and Artwork at David Richard Gallery – Robert Natkin

Robert Nakin, David Richard Gallery

Robert Natkin, Apollo Series 1, 1995, Acrylic on paper on canvas, 21″ x 40”
Copyright © Robert Natkin Estate

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.

ROBERT NATKIN (1930 – 2010)

Born in Chicago in 1930, Robert Natkin studied at the Art School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was deeply drawn to Post-Impressionism. Upon graduation, he spent a year in New York, where he met Willem de Kooning and was influenced by Abstract Expressionism. Returning to Chicago in 1953, he joins a group of painters who would form the core of the seminal 1957 exhibition Momentum held at the Navy Pier. Three years later he would be included in the Whitney Museum exhibition Young America.

His interest in Post-Impressionism, along with early modernists like Klee, Kandinsky and Matisse, combined with the influence of post-war abstraction, served to create his signature style. Bright colors in acrylic and bold shapes were given added dimension through the use of stenciling, creating a variety of surface texture.

In the early 1960s, Natkin introduced paintings with vertical structures that were distinctly different from his previous works. He was interested in the interaction of light and color and wanted to explore that relationship without the concerns and limitations of composition. Like many other artists from that period, he turned to simple geometric forms, a sort of stripe in his case, to provide that freedom and flexibility. Thus, the “Apollo” series, named after the Greek god of sun and poetry, was born. Natkin explored color relationships by juxtaposing colors of differing widths to create a range of visual effects from vibrational to serene and meditative. Unlike Karl Benjamin and Gene Davis, he did not create hard-edged, pristine stripes. Instead, his structures were loose and organic, maintaining his interest in gestural strokes, stenciling and surface texture.

Natkin passed away in 2010 and his career comprises a long roster of museum and gallery exhibitions around the globe and his work can be found in myriad museum collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Centre Pompidou, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Art, the Milwaukee Art Center along with many others.



Featured Artwork from David Richard Gallery – Paul Jenkins – May 3, 2016

 

Paul Jenkins, David Richard Gallery

Paul Jenkins, Phenomena Brave Pilgrim, 1976, Watercolor On Paper, 30″ x 22″,
Copyright © Paul Jenkins Estate

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.
PAUL JENKINS
Kansas City, Missouri native Paul Jenkins (1923-2012) studied at the Art Students League under Yasuo Kuniyoshi. During this time in New York, Jenkins became friends with Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner and Barnett Newman. After working in Europe Jenkins returned to New York, where, in 1956 he had a solo show with the legendary Martha Jackson Gallery, where he continued to show for a number of years.

In 1958 he met the painter Jiro Yoshihara at the Gutai exhibition at the Martha Jackson Gallery and was invited to travel to Japan and work with the group. The gestural abstraction of this avant-garde movement would have a profound impact on his development. It would also lead to his amassing a significant collection of work by the Gutai artists.

In the 60s his work evolved into what became a signature style. Unlike a number of abstract painters at the time, his work was more focused on color theory than experimentation with materials.

The immediacy and transparency of watercolor forms an important part of his oeuvre and in 1972 the Corcoran Gallery organized a two-year travelling show, Paul Jenkins: Works on Paper that featured his explorations into the medium. Watercolor would continue to be a major focus in his work throughout his career.

In 1971-72 Jenkins was the subject of a major retrospective that travelled to the Houston Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art. Jenkins’ work can be found in myriad museum collections around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, the Stedelijk, the Walker Art Center, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.



Featured Artwork from David Richard Gallery – Emily Mason – April 28, 2016

 

Emily Mason, David Richard Gallery

Emily Mason, Mineral, 1989
Oil On Canvas, 52″ x 49.5″, Copyright ©Emily Mason

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.

EMILY MASON (American b. 1932)

Born in New York in 1932, Emily Mason comes from a long line of distinguished artists. Her mother, Alice Trumbull Mason, was an influential participant in the early days of American abstraction and a descendant of the famous history painter John Trumbull.

Upon graduation from the Cooper Union, Mason received a Fulbright Grant to study in Italy, travelling there with her fiancé, the painter Wolf Kahn. For the next 10 years, Rome was to become a second home for the couple. Her first solo exhibition in New York was at the Area Gallery in 1960. The gallery, founded by painter Ed Moses, was one of several artist-run spaces on East 10th Street, representing the avant-garde in New York in the late 50s and early 60s.

Writing in The Brooklyn Rail, publisher and critic Phong Bui describes Mason’s position between abstract expressionism and color field painting, noting: “She was interested in neither the former’s existential angst nor the latter’s use of absorbed color pigments on raw canvas (she paints on primed canvases). By allowing painterly gestures to coexist with thin, poured layers in a wide range of colors in all manner of hues and saturations, Mason is able to amplify her colors—which are infused with forms that derive from both memory and free association with concrete surroundings in nature—while embracing their complex tonalities.”



Go For Baroque | #GoForBaroque

Full disclosure: I am from New York, so I wasn’t expecting much at the Go for Baroque fashion show, a #DRProjects presentation at David Richard Gallery on April 23. After all, I thought, street fashion in Santa Fe is rather, shall I say, ‘comfortable.’

 

Kay Khan, Mark Oppenheimer, #GoForBaroque, David Richard Gallery

Designer Kay Khan with model Mark Oppenheimer in her design “Skin” at Go For Baroque Fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM

 

 

However, what was presented immediately disabused me of such preconceptions. I was rather blown away by the creative sparks that radiated from all of the submissions. Imaginative use of traditional and non-traditional materials was very much the order of the day. Outrageous fantasy was provided by Kay Khan and Alicia Piller, through their adoption and adaptation of the unexpected. Their work was complemented by the exotic luxury of a hand-embroidered silk robe by Kathleen Ferguson-Huntington.

 

Alicia Piller, Graffiti Baroque, David Richard Gallery, #GoForBaroque

Alicia Piller, designer and model, Graffiti Baroque in New Baroque fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo David Eichholtz)

 

 

Kathleen Ferguson-Huntington, David Richard Gallery, @tseringchoney, #GoForBaroque

Kathleen Ferguson-Huntington, Designer (right), “The Mistress of Mercantile A Visual Codex of Silk Road Trade” in Go For Baroque fashion Show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo by tseringchoney)

 

 

Ezra Estes led the ‘ready-to-wear’ category with a collection of serious fun designs for men and women. Beautiful fabrics and intricate patterning defined the pieces – clothes that one could conceivably find in trend-setting shops like Barney’s in New York.

Ezra Estes, Santa Fe Community College Fashion Club., David RIchard Gallery. (photo David Eichholtz)

Erza Estes, designer and model, Santa Fe Community College Fashion Club in Go For Baroque fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo by David Eichholtz)

 

Upcycle designer Olivia Hawkins presented an embroidered skirt and top resurrected from a past life and one of Estes’ students, Rose Willey, an elegant evening ensemble. Elegance was also the byword for the hand-painted and batik raw silk pieces by Andrea Vargas-Mendoza.

 

Alicia Piller, Andrea Vargas-Mendoza, After Life, David Richard Gallery, #GoForBaroque

Alicia Piller & Andrea Vargas-Mendoza, designers in front of their creation “After Life (Tribute to Ana Mendieta)” at Go For Baroque fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo David Eichholtz)

 

Rose Whilley, Elegant Chiffon, David Richard Gallery, #GoForBaroque

Rose Willey, designer, Elegent Chiffon, in Go For Baroque fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo David Eichholtz)

 

Whimsy was on hand with the OTT leopard-print hoodie and hot pants set by Ann Jag (accompanied by a mutant stuffed animal pull-toy) and the amusing and complex embroidered handbags by Ellie Beth Scott.

 

Ann Jag, David Richard Gallery, #GoForBaroque

Ann Jag, Designer, Glamorized Track Suit and Honey Poodle, in Go For Baroque fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo David Eichholtz)

 

 

Ellie Beth Scott, David Richard Gallery, #GoForBaroque

Ellie Beth Scott, designer, “Chick Purse” in Go For Baroque fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo Greg Zinniel)

 

 

For my money the visual highlight was the ensemble created by Dylan Anderson. A black velvet brocade farthingale with a long train was coupled with a painful-looking tightly fitted black corset. A sensational as the outfit was, it was made even more so by Anderson wearing his own magnum opus.

 

Dylan Anderson, David RIchard Gallery, #GoForBaroque

Dylan Anderson, designer and model, Shawl / Neck Piece and Train, in Go For Baroque fashion show at David Richard Gallery in collaboration with @SimplySantaFeNM. (photo Greg Zinniel)

 

The event was emceed by the super-professional Amy Shea, who choreographed the catwalk and introduced each designer and their pieces with an élan befitting the creations.

So hats off to all of the designers, to Amy Shea, to David Richard Gallery and to social media collaborators @SimplySantaFeNM for showing a very special side of the creative energy to be found in Santa Fe, ‘The City Different.

Follow all of the images from the fashion competition and catwalk at #GoForBaroque. Join us for the photography competition and pop up show at the closing night of the exhibition, “New Baroque: The Imperfect Pearl” on Saturday, May 7 at David Richard Gallery.

Howard Rutkowski
2016 April 25



Michele Bubacco participates in the 7th Annual VAF Foundation Prize at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome

Michele Bubacco joins 14 other young artists in the VAF Foundation’s annual showcase of contemporary Italian art. This year’s selection opens at the MACRO in Rome on April 14th and runs till May 29th, 2016. The exhibition will then travel to the Stadtgalerie in Kiel from June 10th through August 28th and then on to the Kunstsammlungen in Chemnitz from November 10 till February 12th 2017.

 

The Franfurt-based VAF Foundation is a private organization founded by Volker Feierbabend in 2000. Dedicated to presenting trends in contemporary Italian art, it seeks to foster a creative dialogue for visual arts culture between Italy and Germany. The Premio Fondazione VAF is an annual curated invitational comprised of Italian artists under 40 years of age.

 

http://www.davidrichardgallery.com/Michele-Bubacco.cfm?ArtistsID=1028

 

Michele Bubacco, Addiction, David RIchard Gallery

Michele Bubacco, The Addiction, 2015, Oil and collage on wood, 62.5 x 45.25″. © Michele Bubacco

 

invito



Justice Whitaker’s Reading at a Strangers Collective Salon Celebrating Meow Wolf’s 8th Anniversary at David Richard Gallery

To celebrate the 8th Anniversary of Meow Wolf and in advance of it’s grand opening of The House of Eternal Return on March 18, David Richard Gallery and Meow Wolf joined forces to showcase the innovative and surprising visual artists working in Santa Fe today.

“Given our respective commitment to the contemporary arts scene in Santa Fe, this exhibition is a perfect partnership between Meow Wolf and David Richard Gallery,” says gallery co-director David Eichholtz. “We see this as an opportunity to support the young artists who are pushing boundaries and bringing something new and exciting into the mix.’

In the 8 years since Meow Wolf formed, the arts production company’s runaway success has helped embolden a new wave of young creatives. In honor of the group’s anniversary, David Richard Gallery collaborated with one of Santa Fe’s newest art collectives for a special tribute. As part of the gallery’s Happy Birthday Meow Wolf! Benefit Exhibition, emerging writers and artists group Strangers Collective invited local writers to share Meow Wolf-inspired work in a special Strangers Salon on Saturday on February 20th.

Says David: “Strangers Collective is another example of the wealth of creative talent to be found in Santa Fe. With a focus on the written word, a new generation of poets, creative writers, journalists and critics are contributing voices to the city’s cultural landscape.”

Setting the tone for the evening’s exchange was Justice Whitaker’s INFiNITE8: A Spoken Word Critical Inquiry to the Artists of Meow Wolf. Delivered in true Beat style Whitaker perfectly nailed the spirit of the event:

This is for a birthday celebration that feels soooo so great. This is for the Infinite 8.

It’s a graphic representation, those of us that work in art should be able to identify.

The Infinity swirls and curves just like the years it takes to give the hours, that give the power to EVEN celebrate 8.

& I recognize the power that Meow Wolf has created for themselves in this beautiful community, and that I respect more than anything else. To create something with the longevity with the vision that looks as beautiful as a piece of art on the wall.

& to see what they have created out of that vision, manifested through the structures, through installations, makes me not want to be patient. Makes me want to be the Infinite 8 – The infinite 8 — that surges forward powering through my work, power through and create. But the Infinite 8 DOES need patience to create.

For, to create something over a distance of time to create something that has longevity and vision requires a community that understands and is behind — a community that pushes.

That’s the Infinite 8.

That’s the Infinite great! Its the Infinite Art. It’s the Infinite Heart. It’s the Infinite 8.

You can see it from now, until the stars: that was 2015!

5 & 1 & 2: That’s the infinite 8,

but now its 2016 and we are propelled ON for the next 8!

for the next 18!

for the next 88!

because Infinity will propel us, if that’s what WE create.

And that’s an important point about the Infinite loop. It does need that inertia, it needs the first push. It does need that community, it does need me and you, it needs the Infinite Art, it needs the infinite Heart, that’s the Infinite 8.

So when we celebrate what’s great about the Infinite 8, we understand that to get there takes power, it takes those 10,000 hours, it takes that commitment from each and every individual that comes thru the Infinite 8 to make the Infinite Great.

That’s the Infinite:

that’s the Infinite this, and the infinite that,

it’s the Infinite white and the Infinite Black

— Well Meow Wolf’s really not that Black —

[laughter]

but that’s Infinite truth,

and that’s the Infinite youth,

and that’s the Infinite ME and that’s the Infinite YOU

So when we look at our Infinite truth, when we look at the Infinite 8; the Infinite Great, what we have created from now to the past? We have to ask, To where does our Infinity continue? How do we reach every nook and cranny of our community & make sure that our Infinite 8 is infinitely great – not the past, but the future Infinite 8.

because thats the infinity we have to think about. If we create future. If we create totems. If we create idolatry. If we create structures & buildings & architecture. If we create paintings on the wall —

& organizations and structures that are just as beautiful as that.

We have to make sure that they are Infinitely rooted and Infinitely embedded. That’s the Infinite Greatness, that’s the Infinite ART, that’s the Infinite community, & when they come together that’s the Infinite HEART.

That’s the infinite great.

& I praise Meow Wolf for what they did seek out to create

& I question Meow Wolf for what they will create for their NEXT Infinite 8

Bless.

 

In the coming days the presentations from the other writers who participated in the Salon Evening will be posted. Stay tuned.

2016 February 20
Santa Fe

 

Meow Wolf, Esteban Bojorquez, Nico Salazar, Sarah Bradley

Meow Wolf artists – Esteban Bojorquez, “Target Practice” and Nico Salazar and Sarah Bradley, “Jackal”

 

 

Meow Wolf, Esteban Bojorquez, Dylan Pommer, Patrick Barrow

Meow Wolf artists, Patrick Barrow, “Shapes of Wrath”, Dylan Pommer, “The Rattlesanke Queen”, and Esteban Bojorquez, “The Manta” and “Steel Royal”

 

 

Meow Wolf, Dylan Pommer

Meow Wolf artist, Dylan Pommer “Buffalo Girl Color Way 3 Circus” and “Buffalo Girl Color Way 3 Death”



formatting

 


formatting

David Richard Gallery, LLC | 1570 Pacheco Street, A1, Santa Fe, NM 87505 | p (505) 983-9555 | f (505) 983-1284


10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday or by appointment


David Richard Contemporary and David Richard Gallery in Santa Fe specialize in Post-War American abstract art including Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, geometric, Op, Pop and Minimalism in a variety of media.

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