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This Week’s Featured Artist and Artwork at David Richard Gallery – Emily Mason

Emily Mason Myself Be Noon, 2002 Oil On Canvas, 39" x 38" Copyright © Emily Mason

Emily Mason
Myself Be Noon, 2002
Oil On Canvas, 39″ x 38″
Copyright © Emily Mason

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.

 

EMILY MASON (American b. 1932)

Born in New York in 1932, Emily Mason comes from a long line of distinguished artists. Her mother, Alice Trumbull Mason, was an influential participant in the early days of American abstraction and a descendant of the famous history painter John Trumbull.

Upon graduation from the Cooper Union, Mason received a Fulbright Grant to study in Italy, travelling there with her fiancé, the painter Wolf Kahn. For the next 10 years, Rome was to become a second home for the couple. Her first solo exhibition in New York was at the Area Gallery in 1960. The gallery, founded by painter Ed Moses, was one of several artist-run spaces on East 10th Street, representing the avant-garde in New York in the late 50s and early 60s.

Writing in The Brooklyn Rail, publisher and critic Phong Bui describes Mason’s position between abstract expressionism and color field painting, noting: “She was interested in neither the former’s existential angst nor the latter’s use of absorbed color pigments on raw canvas (she paints on primed canvases). By allowing painterly gestures to coexist with thin, poured layers in a wide range of colors in all manner of hues and saturations, Mason is able to amplify her colors—which are infused with forms that derive from both memory and free association with concrete surroundings in nature—while embracing their complex tonalities.”



MICHAEL DIXON This Week’s Featured Artist and Artwork

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, The Fourth of July is Yours, Not Mine, 2015, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 36″ x 1.5″ Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

 

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.
MICHAEL DIXON
Michael Dixon explores the personal, societal, and aesthetic struggles of belonging to both “white” and “black” racial and cultural identities, yet simultaneously belonging fully to neither. The works of artists such as Robert Colescott, Beverly McIver, Michael Ray Charles, Glenn Ligon, and Kerry James Marshall have informed his work.

Born in San Diego, Dixon received his MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder and is currently an Associate Professor at Albion College, Michigan. His work has been shown both nationally and internationally in public and private institutions.

 

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, Let Me Say That We Have Failed To Say Something To America Enough, 2015, Oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

 

Artist Statement

“I use self-portraiture as a narrative device to explore the areas of identity, race, identity perception, African American history, and social justice. I often use my own racial identity as the topic of my work. I have experienced fluidity in the perception of my race and ethnicity as a light skinned, bi-racial Black man. My struggles to fit into a racial group category and how I fashion an authentic self, while constantly feeling like an outsider, is the foundational and emotional content of my work. I am primarily interested in the experiences of bi-racial people who might share in this struggle. Is there a unique bi-racial experience? My work seeks to find out.

“Along with my personal identity struggles, the historical legacy of racism in the United States for communities of color informs my experiences. My current work responds to the police killings of unarmed Black men, women, and children across America. While this is a constant attack on the Black community, the increased international media attention, public awareness, and public movements are new phenomena. The recent killings of Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner to Tamir Rice and Michael Brown, illustrate that Black victims can range in age from 12 to 50 years old. This raises the question of the value of Black bodies in contemporary America, which is linked to a long history of violence against its Black population through slavery, Jim Crow, and mass incarceration. My aim is to locate myself in this discussion as a bi-racial Black man who has both been the victim of racism and has in some instances “passed” for white because of my light skin. I see this as the cost of a legacy of racism that particularly troubles me and this conversation must continue.”

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, Raghead I, 2015, Oil on canvas, 20″ x 20″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Fiigure

Michael Dixon, The Antagonist, 2015, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 60″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon

 

Michael Dixon, David Richard Gallery, The Narrative Figure

Michael Dixon, The New Jim Crow, 2015, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 60″ x 1.5″, Copyright ©Michael Dixon



This Week’s Featured Artist and Artwork at David Richard Gallery – Robert Natkin

Robert Nakin, David Richard Gallery

Robert Natkin, Apollo Series 1, 1995, Acrylic on paper on canvas, 21″ x 40”
Copyright © Robert Natkin Estate

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.

ROBERT NATKIN (1930 – 2010)

Born in Chicago in 1930, Robert Natkin studied at the Art School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was deeply drawn to Post-Impressionism. Upon graduation, he spent a year in New York, where he met Willem de Kooning and was influenced by Abstract Expressionism. Returning to Chicago in 1953, he joins a group of painters who would form the core of the seminal 1957 exhibition Momentum held at the Navy Pier. Three years later he would be included in the Whitney Museum exhibition Young America.

His interest in Post-Impressionism, along with early modernists like Klee, Kandinsky and Matisse, combined with the influence of post-war abstraction, served to create his signature style. Bright colors in acrylic and bold shapes were given added dimension through the use of stenciling, creating a variety of surface texture.

In the early 1960s, Natkin introduced paintings with vertical structures that were distinctly different from his previous works. He was interested in the interaction of light and color and wanted to explore that relationship without the concerns and limitations of composition. Like many other artists from that period, he turned to simple geometric forms, a sort of stripe in his case, to provide that freedom and flexibility. Thus, the “Apollo” series, named after the Greek god of sun and poetry, was born. Natkin explored color relationships by juxtaposing colors of differing widths to create a range of visual effects from vibrational to serene and meditative. Unlike Karl Benjamin and Gene Davis, he did not create hard-edged, pristine stripes. Instead, his structures were loose and organic, maintaining his interest in gestural strokes, stenciling and surface texture.

Natkin passed away in 2010 and his career comprises a long roster of museum and gallery exhibitions around the globe and his work can be found in myriad museum collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Centre Pompidou, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Art, the Milwaukee Art Center along with many others.



Featured Artwork from David Richard Gallery – Paul Jenkins – May 3, 2016

 

Paul Jenkins, David Richard Gallery

Paul Jenkins, Phenomena Brave Pilgrim, 1976, Watercolor On Paper, 30″ x 22″,
Copyright © Paul Jenkins Estate

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.
PAUL JENKINS
Kansas City, Missouri native Paul Jenkins (1923-2012) studied at the Art Students League under Yasuo Kuniyoshi. During this time in New York, Jenkins became friends with Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner and Barnett Newman. After working in Europe Jenkins returned to New York, where, in 1956 he had a solo show with the legendary Martha Jackson Gallery, where he continued to show for a number of years.

In 1958 he met the painter Jiro Yoshihara at the Gutai exhibition at the Martha Jackson Gallery and was invited to travel to Japan and work with the group. The gestural abstraction of this avant-garde movement would have a profound impact on his development. It would also lead to his amassing a significant collection of work by the Gutai artists.

In the 60s his work evolved into what became a signature style. Unlike a number of abstract painters at the time, his work was more focused on color theory than experimentation with materials.

The immediacy and transparency of watercolor forms an important part of his oeuvre and in 1972 the Corcoran Gallery organized a two-year travelling show, Paul Jenkins: Works on Paper that featured his explorations into the medium. Watercolor would continue to be a major focus in his work throughout his career.

In 1971-72 Jenkins was the subject of a major retrospective that travelled to the Houston Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Art and the Corcoran Gallery of Art. Jenkins’ work can be found in myriad museum collections around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, the Stedelijk, the Walker Art Center, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.



Featured Artwork from David Richard Gallery – Emily Mason – April 28, 2016

 

Emily Mason, David Richard Gallery

Emily Mason, Mineral, 1989
Oil On Canvas, 52″ x 49.5″, Copyright ©Emily Mason

 

Please contact David Richard Gallery for
the asking price, additional information and high resolution images.

EMILY MASON (American b. 1932)

Born in New York in 1932, Emily Mason comes from a long line of distinguished artists. Her mother, Alice Trumbull Mason, was an influential participant in the early days of American abstraction and a descendant of the famous history painter John Trumbull.

Upon graduation from the Cooper Union, Mason received a Fulbright Grant to study in Italy, travelling there with her fiancé, the painter Wolf Kahn. For the next 10 years, Rome was to become a second home for the couple. Her first solo exhibition in New York was at the Area Gallery in 1960. The gallery, founded by painter Ed Moses, was one of several artist-run spaces on East 10th Street, representing the avant-garde in New York in the late 50s and early 60s.

Writing in The Brooklyn Rail, publisher and critic Phong Bui describes Mason’s position between abstract expressionism and color field painting, noting: “She was interested in neither the former’s existential angst nor the latter’s use of absorbed color pigments on raw canvas (she paints on primed canvases). By allowing painterly gestures to coexist with thin, poured layers in a wide range of colors in all manner of hues and saturations, Mason is able to amplify her colors—which are infused with forms that derive from both memory and free association with concrete surroundings in nature—while embracing their complex tonalities.”



Blog Post – Strangers Collective -Rachel Faith Performance

Blog – Exhibition

David Richard Gallery

2016 April 05

 

 

Shooting Statistics in a Barrel

 

By Rachel Faith

 

I usually write about kids, but this piece concerns statistics and guns. Specifically, this old statistics book punched full of holes that I carry with me.

I’ve been captivated by the bad guy in the ’80’s movie “The NeverEnding Story” since I was a little kid. THE NOTHING is this voracious unstoppable force of entropy that consumes everything in the universe. THE NOTHING has no motive that a sane soul can understand. It simply is. It simply obliterates.

In my life, THE NOTHING is for real. It has obliterated homelands, dreams, relationships, and many beautiful cakes that I dearly loved.

THE NOTHING is the antithesis of creation: the third law of thermodynamics and a serious business indeed.

My research indicates that THE NOTHING is nothing short of the academic discipline of statistics. Beware statistics.

Nearly two years ago I made the decision to go into medicine, which means that as a recovering journalist, I had to go back to school. My desire to become a medicine woman struck the educational establishment as a great opportunity to place a mandatory statistics course in my path.

I have been running from such a thing for thirty-five years, but one can’t run from THE NOTHING forever. It eventually catches up and bites one in the arse.

So I slogged through it. A semester of statistics.

No big deal for lots of people. Huge big deal for me.

I cried. I swore. I flailed about.

I felt my brain turn to waterlogged, colorless cardboard. I began seeing normal distributions in the Cerrillos Hills. The Sangre de Cristos grew bimodal against the uniform distribution of the prairie. My colleagues skewed left, my children skewed right. Cars on Cerrillos Road formed scatterplots. Data sets leached into my dreams.

And then…just like that…it was over. So I called on a gun-owning friend and asked a favor.

With some borrowed hardware from my friend, I took my statistics book out to the shooting range and I shot the shit out of it. About fifty-two times. I turned it into confetti. Then I kicked it. And then I ran it over in a truck just to be sure.

I became THE NOTHING, and it felt good. All this from a person who hates guns.

This wild tangent was triggered when I walked into a room at the David Richard Gallery and saw a piece by Chris Collins based on an object he found around Santa Fe: a metal barrel that someone, at some point, went all NOTHING on and shot the shit out of.

Chris turned the barrel into a lantern, and the bullet holes have become conduits of light. It’s brilliant.

Why did someone go out and shoot the shit out of the barrel in the first place? I can only assume that it was full of statistics and needed to be neutralized. Luckily, you can turn statistics into art while simultaneously disarming it.

To paraphrase Leonard Cohen: there’s a shit-ton of holes in everything. That’s how the light gets in.

 

2016 February 20

Santa Fe

 

This piece was presented by Rachel Faith as a performance and part of the Strangers Collective Salon hosted by David Richard Gallery, a special event and part of Happy Birthday Meow Wolf! A Benefit Exhibition and Event for Meow Wolf’s 8th Anniversary at David Richard Gallery on 20 February 2016

 

 

Rachel Faith, David Richard Gallery, Strangers Collective

Rachel Faith, Shooting Statistics in a Barrel, Performance

 

 

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Rachel Faith, Shooting Statistics in a Barrel, Performance

 

 

IMG_2842

Rachel Faith, Shooting Statistics in a Barrel, Performance

 

 

IMG_2844

Rachel Faith, Shooting Statistics in a Barrel, Performance



International Women’s Day – Celebrating Women Artists at David Richard Gallery

In my long travels I learned early that most artists reject labels, preferring to be known by their work, rather than where they come from, the color of their skin or their gender. Still, whether they inform the work or not, people still feel these hyphenated additions useful, if not important. Not to long ago at an opening for a show I curated in Santa Fe, a local art critic commented on the absence of women artists. My thoughts at the time were that a visual presentation should focus on concept and content and not come with a multi-cultural/mixed gender checklist. Most artists would, I am sure, agree.

 

Subject, message and position have been intertwined with visual art practice since the cave painters of Lescaux. Still, we should approach imagery from a formal aesthetic construct first, then, look to the message later. Regardless of what a painting is trying to say, it still has to be good.

 

There are five women artists showing at the David Richard Gallery; three in its current exhibition New Baroque: The Imperfect Pearl and two to be included in the next show The Narrative Figure. All satisfy the requirement that the work must be vigorous and intelligent and therefore successful in formal terms. Yet each approaches the making of art a very different ways.

 

David Richard Gallery, Catherine Howe

Catherine Howe, Carborundum and Silver (Mantis), 2016, Acrylic, encaustic, metal leaf, carborundum grit on canvas, 48″ x 36″

 

 

David Richard Gallery, Leila Farcas-Ionescu

Leila Farcas-Ionescu, Young Couple 1, Porcelain, stoneware, engobes, glazes, silver, 13 x 15 “

 

Catherine Howe’s focus is on process. Beginning with the tradition of still life painting, the complex amalgam of materials – almost a chemical reaction – send the representational origin far into abstraction.

 

Magic-Realism is the source of Laila Farcas-Ionescu romantically spooky ceramic sculpture. They possess a medieval or Renaissance appearance that suggests a fantasy narrative – a Game of Thrones in clay.

 

Angela Fraleigh imbeds a clear, yet subtle point of view in her swirling, multi-color canvases of female figures appropriated from Baroque and Rococo painting. Her compositions move these women from the objectified role they played in the original paintings and by creating a veil between them and the viewer, provide them with their own private identities.

 

David Richard Gallery, Angela Fraleigh

Angela Fraleigh, Watching the Moon Move, 2015, Oil on canvas, 48″ x 60″

 

Not noticeable at first glance, the porcelain and mixed media sculpture of Daisy Quezade carries the most searing of messages – that of the physical and psychological abuse of women in Latino culture. The human figures are not visible in the actual work, but are represented by the clothing that become vestiges of their existence.

 

The painted, collaged compositions of Tschabalala Self are, on the other hand, celebrations of black women. There is strength and confidence in these representations and the figures stand for a matter-of-fact acceptance of existence and identity.

 

So yes, these are five extremely talented and serious artists who just happen to be women and like good artists anywhere they deserve the support of the entire art community and the general public.

 

Howard Rutkowski

Santa Fe

2016 March 08

 

David Richard Gallery, Daisy Quezada

Daisy Quezada, Arbol de Violencia No. 5, 2014, Porcelain, plexiglass. Courtesy Daisy Quezada.



DR Projects at David Richard Gallery featuring Matthew Kluber, Phillis Ideal, Gregory Botts, and Michael Scott

DR Projects at David Richard Gallery www.DavidRichardGallery.com is a platform that allows the gallery to highlight new and experimental artworks by the gallery’s artists as well as guest artists and curators. It is a pleasure introducing new talent and exciting artwork to the community and our collectors.

 

Currently, DR Projects is featuring new artworks by the following artists.

 

Matthew Kluber has 3 new projections on view in the gallery in a project called “Electr-O-Pura”. Specifically, they are computer-generated digital images projected onto a painted aluminum panel. The combination of the light-based moving digital imagery and stationary painted surface creates a unique hybrid that is stunning. His clever programming and software keeps them fresh. They are like slow moving paintings. Each measures 48” tall by 96” wide. Check them out in the gallery or view short videos of each on the website at http://www.davidrichardgallery.com/Matthew-Kluber-Art.cfm?ArtistsID=805&NewID=8621

Matthew Kluber, David Richard Gallery, Friday I'm in Love

Matthew Kluber, Friday I’m In Love, 2015, Alkyd on aluminum, custom software, computer, digital projection. Ed. 1 of 4. 44 x 96 inches

 

 

Phillis Ideal’s new collages in hot summer colors are featured the project “Copy, Paste, Save”. Ideal pours, brushes, sweeps and smears paint onto a variety of supports: canvas, paper, panel and the floor. The strokes and puddles of color are then cut and assembled onto larger supports and collaged with portions of her works on paper, screens and other found materials. See her new abstractions at http://www.davidrichardgallery.com/Exhibit_Detail.cfm?ShowsID=270

Phillis Ideal, Party Time, David Richard Gallery

Phillis Ideal, Party Time , 2015, Acrylic and collage on panel, 36 x 36 in

 

 

 

Gregory Botts. Earlier this summer the gallery presented a selection of larger site and studio paintings by Botts, side-by-side in a salon hang similar to his presentation in March of this year at Austin Peay University. The presentation shed light on his intricate process for creating his wonderful studio paintings. That process takes representational imagery from paintings from various site locations and combines them with elements of abstraction, all set to the rhythms of poetry, and infused with art criticism and history. The results are compelling paintings that capture a cycle of nature and the evolution of contemporary art. This selection, “The Southern Route” focuses on smaller site paintings, mostly from Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and California. See them in person in the gallery’s Viewing Room and on the following web page: http://www.davidrichardgallery.com/Exhibit_Detail.cfm?ShowsID=271

David Richard Gallery, Gregory Botts, Ghost Ranch Juniper

Gregory Botts, Ghost Ranch Juniper , 2009, Oil on canvas, 24 x 48 inches

 

 

Continuing with landscape painting, Michael Scott’s new project is painting grand landscapes from American National Parks and forests. However, there are some interesting twists and uses of materials, but you will have to wait until the masterpieces are completed and ready to exhibit. Scott’s painting practice strives to capture the awe and scale of nature in the tradition of American landscape painting. He does this by creating a spiritual connection with the landscape and focusing on metaphysical symbols from Native culture—the wolf, owl, spiral of smoke, etc. This project, “On The Road Again” features a number of small studies for the larger scale paintings that Scott painted while traveling around the country in his Bambi camper. See these great studies in the gallery’s Viewing Room or on the following webpage: http://www.davidrichardgallery.com/Exhibit_Detail.cfm?ShowsID=272

Yosemite, Michael Scott, David Richard Gallery

Michael Scott, Yosemite, Oil on board, 10.625 x 8.5 inches

 

Written by David Eichholtz

Santa Fe, August 30, 2015



Art Matters Santa Fe with Kathrine Erickson and David Eichholtz interviewed by Kathryn Davis

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The in-gallery events of “Art Matters | Santa Fe”, hosted by individual galleries and museums and sponsored by the Santa Fe Gallery Association, will feature the diversity of artwork in Santa Fe as well as critical discussions and lectures regarding the specific artists and art historical time periods presented by the host galleries. These events, intended to focus on the galleries, their artists and curatorial programs, will appeal to collectors and art enthusiasts as well as academics and historians and showcase the depth and expertise of Santa Fe gallery collections and owners respectively. The artwork ranges from contemporary abstraction and figuration, modern masters and French Impressionists, film, installations and interactive presentations to historic and twentieth-century Native American art, Japanese Samurai warrior armor and Japanese painting.

Check out this episode



ALLAN GRAHAM (a.k.a. Toadhouse) – Press Release

Allan Graham, YRU, 2013, Graphite and oil on canvas, 42" x 42"

Allan Graham, YRU, 2013, Graphite and oil on canvas, 42″ x 42″

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:


ALLAN GRAHAM (a.k.a. TOADHOUSE)

Any Position Limits the View (We Are Only Here For A Spell)

September 12 – October 19, 2013

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 12, 5:00—7:00 PM

David Richard Gallery

Railyard Arts District

544 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501

p 505-983-9555 | f 505-983-1284

www.DavidRichardGallery.com

David Richard Gallery will present an exhibition surveying the range of text and language-based art by Allan Graham (a.k.a Toadhouse) in his first solo exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition, Any Position Limits the View (We Are Only Here For A Spell), will be presented September 12 – October 19, 2013 at the gallery located on 544 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, phone 505-983-9555 in the Santa Fe Railyard Arts District.

The presentation will feature many different ways in which Allan Graham has attempted over the past thirty years of his career to deconstruct the English language by literally envisaging words, phrases and concepts using the words themselves as the visual language. Canvas and oil paint, handmade paper, graphite, ink, toilet paper rolls and rubber plungers are his varied supports and media. Sometimes the words are presented in standard fonts, other times cursive text streams across the page to create abstract images that become visualizations of phrases such as “Chance Forming On the Edge Of Need” and “Why Forming In An Is Universe.” His latest paintings are comprised of four letter words written with no spaces and the letters stacked in quadrants, two over two. Initially, the viewer sees a pattern in black and white, some purely geometric and others a bit more anthropomorphic depending upon the grouping of letters, but then the actual word emerges through the abstraction. Through his work the viewer realizes language is an abstraction, both in the way it is spoken and written. The meaning and power of language is not only in the content of the chosen word, but more in the context in which it is delivered and even then, subject to personal interpretation.

Also featured will be Add-Verse, a two part collaborative project between Gloria Graham, Allan Graham and twenty-five poets produced during 2003 to 2005. The video portion is comprised of a montage of 3 to 5 minute segments of each poet reading their own poetry in their natural setting with just their hands and the text from which they are reading captured on video. It is a seamless loop with no interruption or introduction between the poets to produce one continuous poem. Also presented are spontaneous photographs of each poet taken during their individual readings that measure 24 x 24 inches square in black and white. The featured poets who collaborated on the project include: Jimmy Santiago Baca, Mei mei Berssenbrugge, Maxine Chernoff, Wanda Coleman, Clark Coolidge, Robert Creeley, Diane Di Prima, Vincent Ferrini, Gene Frumkin, Barbara Guest, Lyn Hejinian, Jane Hirshfield, Anselm Hollo, Paul Hoover, Joanne Kyger, Nathaniel Mackey, Jackson Mac Low, Michael McClure, Harryette Mullen, V. B. Price, Carl Rakosi, Tom Raworth, Arthur Sze, Anne Waldman and John Yau.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue with an essay by the poet, art critic and historian John Yau.

Allan Graham’s studio practice includes painting, drawing and sculpture in a variety of media and his artwork has been exhibited and collected internationally. He has had numerous solo exhibitions and artwork work included in group exhibitions in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Tucson, Dallas, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Rome and Varese, Italy, Lugano, Switzerland and Dusseldorf, Germany among other cities. His art is included in the permanent collections of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo, NY), Villa Menafoglio Litta Panza (Varese, IT), The Panza Collection, Museo Cantonale d’ Arte (Lugano, Switzerland), High Museum of Art (Atlanta, GA), Museum of Fine Arts (Santa Fe, NM), University Of New Mexico Art Museum (Albuquerque), Albuquerque Museum (NM), Denver Art Museum (CO), Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery at U. Of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE), Roswell Museum and Art Center (NM), Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College (Saratoga Springs, NY), and Blanton Museum of Art at University of Texas (Austin, TX). Allan Graham was born in San Francisco, CA. He studied at the University of New Mexico, San Francisco Art Institute and San Jose State University and was awarded the National Endowment for the Arts in 1985 and a Pollock Krasner grant in 2012. He currently lives and works in New Mexico.

Gloria Graham’s art making practice explores interactions at the molecular, physical and metaphysical levels with a focus on ephemera and the ethereal captured through her camera lens and drawings. She has had many solo exhibitions and her artwork included in numerous group exhibitions in New York, Los Angeles, Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Houston, Marfa, Buffalo, Denver, Verona, IT, Lugano, Switzerland and Japan. Her artwork is included in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art (NY), The Lannan Foundation, The Broida Foundation, Albright Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo, NY), Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, TX), The Panza Collection, Museo Cantonale d’ Arte (Lugano, Switzerland), Harwood Museum of Art (Taos, NM), Denver Art Museum (CO), Roswell Museum and Art Center (NM), North Dakota Museum of Art (Grand Forks, ND), Albuquerque Museum (NM) and Museum of Fine Arts (Santa Fe, NM). Graham studied at U. California, Berkeley and Baylor University with graduate studies at U. Wisconsin and U. New Mexico. She lives and works in New Mexico.

David Richard Gallery specializes in post-war abstract art including Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, geometric and hard-edge painting, Op Art, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminism and conceptualism in a variety of media. Featuring both historic and contemporary artwork, the gallery represents many established artists who were part of important art historical movements and tendencies that occurred during the 1950s through the 1980s on both the east and west coasts. The gallery also represents artist estates, emerging artists and offers secondary market works.

Gallery Hours: Sunday through Saturday, 10 AM to 5 PM

For additional information please contact: David Eichholtz

505-983-9555

D@DavidRichardGallery.com



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David Richard Gallery, LLC | 1570 Pacheco Street, A1, Santa Fe, NM 87505 | p (505) 983-9555 | f (505) 983-1284


10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday or by appointment


David Richard Contemporary and David Richard Gallery in Santa Fe specialize in Post-War American abstract art including Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, geometric, Op, Pop and Minimalism in a variety of media.

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